Stop the Bleed White Logo

Approximately 40% of trauma-related deaths worldwide are due to bleeding or its consequences. A person who is bleeding can die from blood loss within five minutes, so it is important to stop blood loss as quickly as possible.

No matter how rapid the arrival of professional emergency responders, bystanders will always be first on the scene. Those nearest to someone with life threatening injuries are best positioned to provide first care.

Stop the Bleed is a national awareness campaign and call-to-action. Stop the Bleed is intended to cultivate grassroots efforts that encourage bystanders to become trained, equipped, and empowered to help in a bleeding emergency before professional help arrives.

Franklin County Board of Commissioners Logo

Thanks to grant funding from the Franklin County Board of Commissioners, Franklin County Public Health is able to offer free training to schools in the county.

Stop the Bleed Training for Schools

Host a free training for teachers, staff and administration. Schools that register for the training will get:

A free two-hour training that is an important step to prepare for a mass casualty incident

Hands-on training so non-medical people can try and save a life by recognizing and controlling life threatening blood loss

A free life saving treatment kit (one per school)

Ready to request a training? Click here!

If you have questions or need additional information call (614) 525-4947 or email evawollerman@franklilncountyohio.gov.

History of Stop the Bleed

Stop the Bleed Full Color LogoIn April 2013, a few months after the active shooter event at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, CT, the Joint Committee to Create a National Policy to Enhance Survivability from Intentional Mass Casualty and Active Shooter Events was convened by the American College of Surgeons (ACS). This was done in collaboration with the medical community and representatives from the federal government, the National Security Council, the U.S. military, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and governmental and non-governmental emergency medical response organizations, among others. The committee was formed to create a protocol for national policy to enhance survivability from active shooter and intentional mass casualty events. One of the committee’s reports is called the Hartford Consensus. The Stop the Bleed campaign is a direct result of the Hartford Consensus III: Implementation of Bleeding Control.
For more information on the Stop the Bleed program visit www.bleedingcontrol.org.