What to Know Right Now

About MPX

MPX is a rare disease caused by the MPX virus. MPX virus is part of the same family of viruses that causes smallpox. MPX symptoms are similar to smallpox symptoms, but not as severe. MPX is rarely fatal. MPX is not related to chickenpox.

MPX spreads in different ways:

Direct contact with MPX rash, scabs or body fluids

Breathing in droplets from an infected person – such as sneezing or discharge - during face-to-face contact, such as kissing, cuddling or sex

Touching items (clothing or bedding) that previously touched the rash or body fluids of an infected person

MPX Symptoms

 

MPX symptoms of concern include:

  • Headache
  • Fever*
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Exhaustion
  • Backache
  • Chills
  • New skin rash*
  • Muscle pain

* Fever and rash occur in nearly all people infected with MPX virus.

 

 

If you think you have been exposed or have MPX symptoms like a rash, contact your doctor. Testing is the best way to determine if an infection is MPX. While you wait for your test results, avoid close contact with others and wear a face mask if isolation is not possible.

Did you know?

  • A MPX rash will go through many stages, including scabbing, before healing.
  • MPX can be spread from the time symptoms start until the rash has completely healed and a fresh layer of skin has formed.
  • The sickness usually lasts 2–4 weeks.

Additional Resources

Vaccine Information

Franklin County Public Health is supporting the  Monkeypox (MPX) vaccination clinics offered at Columbus Public Health. Learn more about MPX vaccines and clinics by visiting the Columbus Public Health’s webpage.

The MPX vaccine (called JYNNEOS) is approved by the FDA for those who are 18 years and older, however, supplies are limited. Columbus Public Health and FCPH are working with community partners to offer the vaccine to those most at risk as quickly as possible.

The vaccine is provided four to 14 days after being exposed to MPX. It can also be used for prevention. It requires two doses, given 28 days apart.

MPX Vaccine Clinic Information

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

MPX is a rare disease caused by the MPX virus. MPX virus is part of the same family of viruses that causes smallpox. MPX symptoms are similar to smallpox symptoms, but not as severe. MPX is rarely fatal. MPX is not related to chickenpox.

MPX spreads in different ways. The virus can spread from person-to-person through:

  • Direct contact with the MPX rash, scabs, or body fluids.
  • Respiratory discharge during long, face-to-face contact, or during intimate physical contact, such as kissing, cuddling or sex.
  • Touching items (such as clothing or bedding) that previously touched the MPX rash or body fluids.

MPX can spread from the time symptoms start until the rash has fully healed and a fresh layer of skin has formed. The illness typically lasts 2-4 weeks. People who do not have MPX symptoms cannot spread the virus to others.

Testing is the best way to determine if an infection is MPX. Contact your doctor if you have a new rash or had close contact with someone who may have had MPX. While you wait to hear your test result, avoid close contact with others, including sex and cuddling. Cover skin rashes and wear a face mask if isolation is not possible.

Anyone can get MPX. You are at a higher risk if you:

  • Have been exposed to someone who had a rash that looks like MPX or was diagnosed with MPX.
  • Had multiple sex partners in the last 14 days in a place where MPX was present or in an area where the virus is spreading.
  • Anyone can get MPX if you come in contact with someone infected by the virus. At this point in time, it is important to note that most reported cases have occurred in men who have sex with men.

For more information, or for questions, contact fcph@franklincountyohio.gov.